November 10, 2011

Four MIT Football Players Selected to Capital One Academic All-District Team

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – Four MIT football players were named to the Capital One Academic All-District team the College Sports Information Directors of America announced today. Senior defensive end Tyler Wagner (Bel Air, Md.), junior offensive lineman Ethan Peterson (Rutland, Vt.), sophomore Rhys Borchert (Pocatello, Idaho) and sophomore quarterback John Wenzel (Mandeville, La.) were the Engineers selected for the honor. The four will now advance to the Capitol One Academic All-America ballot, from which first, second and third team All-America honorees will be selected later in November.

Wagner is a National Football Foundation 2011 Scholar-Athlete nominee and was an academic All-New England Football Conference pick in 2010. He finished the 2011 season second on squad among defensive linemen in tackles and was tied for third on the team in tackles for loss with a career best 4.0. Selected as a Paul E. Gray researcher at MIT, he received funding for MIT's International Genetically Engineered Machines competition team.

A three-year starter on the offensive line, Peterson was an All-NEFC pick in 2010. An academic All-NEFC selection in 2010, he has played in every game during his MIT career and has helped clear the way for a 2011 rushing attack that increased its output by over 30 percent from a year ago.

One of MIT's starting safeties, Borchert finished third among safeties in tackles for MIT in 2011. One of the team's primary kick returners, he finished eighth in the NEFC in average kick return yards. As  a student at MIT he has conducted nanofluids research at the Institute's Green Center for Physics.

MIT's starter at quarterback all season, Wenzel ranks in the top-10 in the NEFC in passing yards per game and total offense, throwing for over 1,100 yards and eight touchdowns in 2011. Already among the all-time passing leaders at MIT, he was also the team's starting punter in 2011. On campus he has performed research in human factors engineering MIT's AgeLab to translate technologies into practical solutions to improve people's health.